San Francisco

Three days of design, code, and content with:

Set yourself apart.

An Event Apart San Francisco is three days of intense focus on digital design, UX, and more. If you care about creating the best possible experiences for the people who use your work, and crave concentrated time to level up your skills in the company of your peers, An Event Apart is the conference you’ve been waiting for.

Seating is limited — Register Now!

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Event Schedule

  1. Arrival Day

  2. Early registration/Badge pick-up

    Avoid the check-in line Monday morning by checking in Sunday afternoon outside the Grand Ballroom. We’ll be fully staffed to get you checked in for the event, and to answer any questions you might have. Be the first to get all the goodies and breeze straight into the ballroom the next morning!

  1. Day 1

  2. Attendee Event Check-in/Badge Pick-up

  3. Breakfast

  4. Morning Welcome

  5. Designing With Web Standards in 2016

    It’s been thirteen years since the first edition of Designing With Web Standards turned our industry on its ear, changing the way we design and develop websites. ​In a web ruled by Flash, table layouts, and sites coded to work in only one browser or another, DWWS showed how to make web content and experiences available to all people, browsers, devices, and search engines. It was heady stuff back in 2003. But how well do the tactics and strategies the book and subsequent editions recommended hold up in our multi-device, framework- and app-driven web of 2016? Is it time to discard progressive enhancement, semantic markup, and accessibility? Or can these ​techniques still help us master today’s complex design and development challenges? Survey the state of the art, and learn how to ensure that your site will work everywhere—today and tomorrow.

  6. Practical Branding

    Over the past few years our skill sets have been firmly planted in understanding this new era of multi-faceted web design. While we’ve all been busy making sure our designs adhere to the latest flat trend and performance specifications, we’ve forgotten that what once got us all talking, before we looked under the hood at the code, was visually striking websites. We’ve come to believe that simply re-designing to increase visual pleasure and memorability is somehow not okay. In this talk, Sarah will discuss what designing brands (including personal brands) looks like in 2016 and the social ecosystems that accompany them—without a “golden ratio” overlay in sight.

  7. New Users Matter, Too! Designing Better Onboarding Experiences

    First impressions matter. A good first​-​time user experience establishes a foundation for future engagement, while a bad one can mean abandonment. What kind of first impression is your product giving? This ​presentation is for anyone who designs products​​ and wants to create an experience that better engages and informs new users. You’ll get an overview of best practices as they relate to learning and engagement, including patterns and anti-patterns. You’ll also get suggestions for next steps, regardless of whether you’re starting on a fresh new ​site or ​product​,​ or revising an existing one.

  8. Revolutionize Your Page: Real Art Direction on the Web

    We finally have the tools necessary to create amazing page designs on the web. Now we can art direct our layouts, leveraging the power and tradition of graphic design. In this eye-opening talk, Jen will explore concrete examples of an incredible range of new possibilities. She’ll walk through a step-by-step design process for figuring out how to create a layout as unique as your content. You’ll learn how Flexbox, Grid, Shapes, Multicolumn, Viewport Units, and more can be combined together to revolutionize how you approach the page —any page.

  9. New CSS Layout Meets the Real World

    In a world of evergreen, automatically updating browsers we need to change the way we think about browser support. It makes little sense to sign off on a brief mentioning target browsers when new features may become usable during the course of a project build. To be truly future friendly, we need to build with that future in mind—adding enhancements that our users’ browsers will grow into, release by release, our work getting better without us doing any more work on it. In this session, Rachel will demonstrate with practical examples how to embrace the new layout methods in CSS, without needing to cut off people who are using browsers that haven’t caught up yet, and show you how to get the best from the magic of Flexbox and Grid—without needing to lean on JavaScript and polyfills to get there.

  10. Style Guide Best Practices

    We’re tasked with creating experiences that look and function beautifully across a dizzying array of devices and environments. That’s a tall order in and of itself, but once you factor in other team members, clients, stakeholders, and organizational quirks, things start looking downright intimidating. With so many variables to consider, we need solid ground to stand on. Style guides are quickly proving to be foundational tools for tackling this increasingly-diverse web landscape while still maintaining your sanity. Style guides promote consistency, establish a shared vocabulary, make testing easier, and lay a future-friendly foundation. This session will detail best practices and considerations for creating and maintaining style guides, so you can set up your organization for success.

  11. Opening Night Happy Hour

    Join us at our Halloween Happy Hour Apart, to be held right outside the main ballroom. We’ll provide tasty snacks and tastier beverages to recharge your body after a full day of recharging your mind!

  12. Evening Session: The Future of Web Design is Not Code

    In the last 30 years, every digital creative discipline (3D animation, visual effects, digital painting, etc.) has seen the emergence of powerful visual software that helps designers get their work done - except for web design. Building a website or digital product still requires that you either become a coder, or work with a developer to bring your idea to life. We need a revolution in web design - one that will make building for the web more accessible to all creative people, regardless of their coding abilities. In this session, you'll see a glimpse of the future of web design, and learn how software will soon reshape our industry.

  1. Day 2

  2. Breakfast

  3. Morning Welcome

  4. Evaluating Technology

    We work with technology every day. And every day it seems like there's more and more technology to understand: graphic design tools, build tools, frameworks and libraries, not to mention new HTML, CSS and JavaScript features landing in browsers. How should we best choose which technologies to invest our time in? When we decide to weigh up the technology choices that confront us, what are the best criteria for doing that? This talk will help you evaluate tools and technologies in a way that best benefits the people who use the websites that we are designing and developing. Let's take a look at some of the hottest new web technologies like service workers and web components. Together we will dig beneath the hype to find out whether they will really change life on the web for the better.

  5. Designing Meaningful Animation

    Motion design has become a necessary skill for designing and building the modern web. The character and energy that motion brings to an interface is becoming as expected on the web as it is in other media. Great web animation comes from thinking like a motion designer and brand steward, matching the motion we add to our message and design goals. Learn key animation principles such as timing, offsets, and secondary action as they apply to interface design decisions—plus motion principles specific to designing animated interactions. Consider this your crash course on becoming a motion design pro!

  6. Adapting to Input

    Responsive Web Design has forced us to accept that we don't know the size of our canvas, and we've learned to embrace the squishiness of the web. Input, it turns out, is every bit as challenging as screen size. We have tablets with keyboards, laptops that become tablets, laptops with touch screens, phones with physical keyboards, and even phones that become desktop computers. In this session, Jason will guide you through the input landscape, showing you new forms of input like sensors and voice control, as well as new lessons about old input standbys. You'll learn the design principles necessary to build web sites that respond and adapt to whatever input people use.

  7. Special Screening: CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap

    Robin Hauser Reynolds, Director/Producer; Staci Hartman, Producer. From Finish Line Features.

    Tech jobs are growing three times faster than our colleges are producing computer science graduates. By 2020, there will be one million unfilled software engineering jobs in the USA. Through compelling interviews and artistic animation, CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap examines the varied reasons why more girls and people of color are not seeking opportunities in computer science and explores how mindsets, stereotypes, clogs in the educational pipeline, startup culture, a lack of role models, and sexism all play roles. Expert voices from the worlds of tech, psychology, science, and education—including coders at Yelp, Facebook, Google, Twitter, Pinterest, Strava, Pandora, GitHub, and Pivotal—are intercut with inspiring stories of women who are engaged in the fight to challenge complacency in the tech industry and have their voices heard. CODE aims to inspire change in mindsets, in the educational system, in startup culture, and in the way women see themselves in the field of coding. More an initial survey than a final declaration, CODE hopes to inspire the audience to begin the changes that will one day narrow the gap.

  8. Extreme Design

    How can we be sure we’re creating the best design experiences possible? It turns out that creating great experiences for a particular subset of our users—people with disabilities—results in better designs for everyone. Focusing relentlessly on accessibility helps us think of extreme scenarios and ask questions like “how can we make this work eyes free?” and “how can we make this work with the least amount of typing?” Explore multiple methods of extremifying your designs—stressing them in ways they haven’t been stressed before—to illuminate opportunities for innovation, efficiency, and excellence that lead to great designs for everyone.

  9. Compassionate Design

    Designers are skilled at creating an ideal experience for idealized users. But what happens when our idealized experience collides with messy, human reality? Designs can frustrate, alienate, or even offend; form options can exclude; on-boarding processes can turn away; interactions can reject or even endanger. The more we build websites and digital products that touch every aspect of our lives, the more critical it becomes for us to start designing for imperfect, distressed, and vulnerable situations—designing interfaces that don’t attempt to make everything seamless, but instead embrace and accommodate the rough edges of the human experience. In this talk, Eric will explore a wide variety of failure modes, from the small to the life-changing, and show how reorienting your perspective and making simple additions to your process can help anticipate and avoid these failures, leading to more humane, and ultimately more compassionate, outcomes.

  10. Top Task Management: Making it Easier to Prioritize

    In an age of increasing complexity, prioritizing will be a key skill. Anybody can add features or content. In fact, in this age of glut it’s the easiest thing in the world to do. Top Tasks Management helps you identify the top tasks in your projects (what really matters). Just as importantly, you'll discover the tiny tasks, the low-level tasks that flood designs and content pages, smothering simplicity and confusing your users with an ocean of features and content. Top Tasks Management is a method, developed over ten years of research, that will help you focus on what really matters in your projects, giving you the evidence to remove that which doesn't. It’s been used to great effect by organizations such as Cisco, Microsoft, Lenovo, Google, and the European Commission. Gerry will teach you how to identify the top and tiny tasks in your projects and you'll walk away with a strategy, giving you the ability to defend your decisions to your team and to management.

  1. A Day Apart

    This full-day session, which includes a full breakfast and lunch, follows An Event Apart and runs 9:00am-4:00pm on Wednesday, November 2. Register for all three days and save more than $200 off the cost of registering separately for the conference and A Day Apart.

  2. Designing Layouts: The New Superpowers of CSS

    Everything about web page layout is about to change. A plethora of new CSS properties for layout is about to give us super powers for building web pages. It’s as big a change as when we left behind tables for CSS—maybe bigger. There is an incredible amount to learn, including entirely new concepts of layout behavior.

    Want a head start? Join Jen Simmons as she walks you through the most important new CSS properties, and shows you how to combine them into real-world usecases.

    You will:

    • Learn how to write the code for CSS Grid, Flexbox, Shapes, Multicolumn, and more.
    • Gain a new and powerful toolset for page design.
    • Learn a process that simplifies the complexity and allows you to get to the matter at hand.
    • See concrete examples of innovative layouts.
    • Leave with a vision of what’s newly possible and where the industry is going.

    This full-day learning experience is for anyone who has a hand in designing or developing web pages: product managers, graphic designers, interface designers, experience designers, and front-end designer/developers.

    You may already be proficient at CSS, and want to learn the new code. Perhaps you do not know CSS, and would like to learn some. Maybe you don’t really even want to learn CSS, but you want to understand the new possibilities, so you can better direct the design process. If any of these situations sound familiar, this day is absolutely for you.

     

Pricing

Conference + A Day Apart Pass October 31-November 2, 2016 $1,390.00 Buy Now!

  • Standard Pricing through October 30: $1,390.00
  • At-the-Door Pricing through November 2: $1,490.00

Conference Pass October 31-November 1, 2016 $1,095.00 Buy Now!

  • Standard Pricing through October 30: $1,095.00
  • At-the-Door Pricing through November 1: $1,195.00

A Day Apart Pass November 2, 2016 $549.00 Buy Now!

  • Standard Pricing through November 1: $549.00
  • At-the-Door Pricing through November 2: $649.00

Location

Westin St. Francis 335 Powell St San Francisco, CA 94102

The Westin St. Francis has arranged special room rates for An Event Apart attendees: just $299/night plus free in-room internet access for the duration of your stay. Call (415) 397-7000 and request the “An Event Apart special rate.” Limited rooms are available at this rate, so don’t delay.

More than just a hotel, The Westin St. Francis on Union Square has been a celebrated destination since 1904. The historic Magneta Grandfather Clock located in the landmark lobby has been a popular gathering spot for generations of travelers, white marble columns, ornate balconies and intricate woodwork transport guests back to the elegance of yesteryear. Discover the allure of the city’s most charismatic and vital setting offering the grandeur of the past, coupled with contemporary luxury and style.

Seating is limited — Register Now!